Size matters: height, cell number and a person's risk of cancer

@article{Nunney2018SizeMH,
  title={Size matters: height, cell number and a person's risk of cancer},
  author={Leonard Nunney},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B},
  year={2018},
  volume={285}
}
  • L. Nunney
  • Published 24 October 2018
  • Biology
  • Proceedings of the Royal Society B
The multistage model of carcinogenesis predicts cancer risk will increase with tissue size, since more cells provide more targets for oncogenic somatic mutation. However, this increase is not seen among mammal species of different sizes (Peto's paradox), a paradox argued to be due to larger species evolving added cancer suppression. If this explanation is correct, the cell number effect is still expected within species. Consistent with this, the hazard ratio for overall cancer risk per 10 cm… 

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