Size-biased allocation of prey from male to offspring via female: family conflicts, prey selection, and evolution of sexual size dimorphism in raptors

@article{Sonerud2012SizebiasedAO,
  title={Size-biased allocation of prey from male to offspring via female: family conflicts, prey selection, and evolution of sexual size dimorphism in raptors},
  author={Geir A. Sonerud and Ronny Steen and Line M. L{\o}w and Line T. R{\o}ed and Kristin Skar and Vidar Sel{\aa}s and Tore Slagsvold},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2012},
  volume={172},
  pages={93-107}
}
In birds with bi-parental care, the provisioning link between prey capture and delivery to dependent offspring is regarded as often symmetric between the mates. However, in raptors, the larger female usually broods and feeds the nestlings, while the smaller male provides food for the family, assisted by the female in the latter part of the nestling period, if at all. Prey items are relatively large and often impossible for nestlings to handle without extended maternal assistance. We video… Expand
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