Size and mating success in males of the western harvester ant,Pogonomyrmex occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

@article{Wiernasz2005SizeAM,
  title={Size and mating success in males of the western harvester ant,Pogonomyrmex occidentalis (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)},
  author={Diane C. Wiernasz and J. D. Yencharis and Blaine J. Cole},
  journal={Journal of Insect Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={8},
  pages={523-531}
}
Mating success in males of the lek mating ant species,Pogonomyrmex occidentalis, increases with increased body size. We estimated the magnitude of the selection coefficients on components of size by collecting males in copula and comparing their morphology to that of males that were collected at the lek but that were not mating. Four characters, body mass, head width, wing length, and leg length, were measured for a sample of 225 mating and 324 nonmating males and 225 females. Significant… 

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