Size Control in Animal Development

@article{Conlon1999SizeCI,
  title={Size Control in Animal Development},
  author={Ian Conlon and Martin C. Raff},
  journal={Cell},
  year={1999},
  volume={96},
  pages={235-244}
}
We thank Sally Leevers, Bill Richardson, and David Weinkove for provocative discussions, and Bruce Edgar, Sally Leevers, Anne Mudge, Rahul Parnaik, Bill Richardson, and David Weinkove for helpful comments on the manuscript. We are also grateful to Se-Jin Lee for providing the pictures for Figure 2Figure 2. I. C. and M. R. are supported by an MRC studentship and program grant, respectively. 

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