Sisters of the Sinuses: Cetacean Air Sacs

@article{Reidenberg2008SistersOT,
  title={Sisters of the Sinuses: Cetacean Air Sacs},
  author={Joy S. Reidenberg and Jeffrey T Laitman},
  journal={The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2008},
  volume={291}
}
  • J. Reidenberg, J. Laitman
  • Published 1 November 2008
  • Medicine
  • The Anatomical Record: Advances in Integrative Anatomy and Evolutionary Biology
This overview assesses some distinguishing features of the cetacean (whale, dolphin, porpoise) air sac system that may relate to the anatomy and function of the paranasal sinuses in terrestrial mammals. The cetacean respiratory tract has been modified through evolution to accommodate living in water. Lack of paranasal sinuses in modern cetaceans may be a diving adaptation. Bone‐enclosed air chambers are detrimental, as their rigid walls may fracture during descent/ascent due to contracting/re… 
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