Single-Therapy Androgen Suppression in Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer

@article{Seidenfeld2000SingleTherapyAS,
  title={Single-Therapy Androgen Suppression in Men with Advanced Prostate Cancer},
  author={Jerome Seidenfeld and David Kiilu Samson and Vic Hasselblad and Naomi E. Aronson and Peter C. Albertsen and Charles L. Bennett and Timothy J. Wilt},
  journal={Annals of Internal Medicine},
  year={2000},
  volume={132},
  pages={566-577}
}
Androgen ablation delays clinical progression and palliates symptoms of metastatic disease in men with advanced prostate cancer (1-4). The earliest method was orchiectomy, and diethylstilbestrol (DES) subsequently became the first reversible method (5-7). Newer alternatives include luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) agonists, such as leuprolide, goserelin, and buserelin (8-10), and nonsteroidal antiandrogens, such as flutamide, nilutamide, and bicalutamide (11-13). Cyproterone acetate… 
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This review will focus on the current medical and surgical options for ADT in advanced and metastatic prostate cancer, summarizing the results of several recent clinical trials and discuss their implications for clinical practice and for future research in this disease.
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Endocrine treatment of prostate cancer
  • T. Tammela
  • Medicine
    The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
  • 2004
TLDR
Data support that androgen deprivation is an effective treatment for patients with advanced prostate cancer, however, although it improves survival, it is not curative, and creates a spectrum of unwanted effects that influence quality of life.
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TLDR
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