Singing in the Brain: Insights from Cognitive Neuropsychology

@article{Peretz2004SingingIT,
  title={Singing in the Brain: Insights from Cognitive Neuropsychology},
  author={I. Peretz and L. Gagnon and S. H{\'e}bert and J. Macoir},
  journal={Music Perception},
  year={2004},
  volume={21},
  pages={373-390}
}
Singing abilities are rarely examined despite the fact that their study represents one of the richest sources of information regarding how music is processed in the brain. In particular, the analysis of singing performance in brain-damaged patients provides key information regarding the autonomy of music processing relative to language processing. Here, we review the relevant literature, mostly on the perception and memory of text and tunes in songs, and we illustrate how lyrics can be… Expand

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