Simon Marius’s Mundus Iovialis: 400th Anniversary in Galileo’s Shadow

@article{Pasachoff2015SimonMM,
  title={Simon Marius’s Mundus Iovialis: 400th Anniversary in Galileo’s Shadow},
  author={J. Pasachoff},
  journal={Journal for the History of Astronomy},
  year={2015},
  volume={46},
  pages={218 - 234}
}
  • J. Pasachoff
  • Published 2015
  • Physics
  • Journal for the History of Astronomy
  • Simon Marius, Court Astronomer in Ansbach in Germany, independently discovered the moons of Jupiter one day after Galileo’s widely accepted discovery on 7 January 1610. Because Marius was using the Julian calendar (so-called O.S., Old Style), his discovery was made in 1609, though adding the 10 days of difference to transform, to the Gregorian calendar (so-called N.S., New Style) that Galileo was using, his notes of his discovery give 8 January 1610 (N.S.). Further, though Galileo famously… CONTINUE READING

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