Similarity in multilegged locomotion: Bouncing like a monopode

@article{Blickhan2004SimilarityIM,
  title={Similarity in multilegged locomotion: Bouncing like a monopode},
  author={Reinhard Blickhan and Robert J. Full},
  journal={Journal of Comparative Physiology A},
  year={2004},
  volume={173},
  pages={509-517}
}
Despite impressive variation in leg number, length, position and type of skeleton, similarities of legged, pedestrian locomotion exist in energetics, gait, stride frequency and ground-reaction force. Analysis of data available in the literature showed that a bouncing, spring-mass, monopode model can approximate the energetics and dynamics of trotting, running, and hopping in animals as diverse as cockroaches, quail and kangaroos. From an animal's mechanical-energy fluctuation and ground… Expand

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