• Corpus ID: 10643520

Similarity in flight behaviour between the honeybee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: apidae) and its presumed mimic, the dronefly Eristalis tenax (Diptera: syrphidae).

@article{Golding2001SimilarityIF,
  title={Similarity in flight behaviour between the honeybee Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: apidae) and its presumed mimic, the dronefly Eristalis tenax (Diptera: syrphidae).},
  author={Yvonne Golding and Antony Roland Ennos and Malcolm Edmunds},
  journal={The Journal of experimental biology},
  year={2001},
  volume={204 Pt 1},
  pages={
          139-45
        }
}
It is generally accepted that the dronefly Eristalis tenax is a Batesian mimic of the honeybee Apis mellifera. Previous work has established that the foraging behaviour of droneflies is more similar to that of its model than to that of other more closely related flies, suggesting that behaviour may be important in the mimicry. Locomotor mimicry has been demonstrated in mimetic Heliconius butterflies but not in hoverflies. This study therefore investigated aspects of the flight behaviour of… 

Figures from this paper

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TLDR
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TLDR
Assaying the behavior of 57 field-caught species of mimetic hover flies and quantifying their morphological similarity to a range of potential hymenopteran models concluded that not all good mimics were behavioral mimics.
DOES THE ABUNDANCE OF HOVERFLY (SYRPHIDAE) MIMICS DEPEND ON THE NUMBERS OF THEIR HYMENOPTERAN MODELS?
TLDR
It is concluded that many hoverflies show behavioral mimicry of their hymenopteran models, perhaps reflecting an ancestral resemblance to honeybees.
Moving like a model: mimicry of hymenopteran flight trajectories by clearwing moths of Southeast Asian rainforests
TLDR
This work describes zigzag flights of sesiid bee mimics that are nearly indistinguishable from those of sympatric bees, whereas sesiids wasp mimics display faster, straighter flights more akin to those of wasps.
Does the abundance of hoverfly mimics (Syrphidae) depend on the numbers of their hymenopteran models
TLDR
It is concluded that many hoverflies show behavioral mimicry of their hymenopteran models, perhaps reflecting an ancestral resemblance to honeybees.
Mimicry in hoverflies (Diptera: Syrphidae): a field test of the competitive mimicry hypothesis
TLDR
Overall, it is found no compelling evidence in this study to support the contention that wasp-like warning signals of hoverflies prevent other flower visitors from sharing flower resources, although insects showed a greater tendency to avoid visiting flowers pinned with a wasp compared with flowers pins with a nonmimetic fly.
Hesitation behaviour of hoverflies Sphaerophoria spp. to avoid ambush by crab spiders
TLDR
It is suggested that hesitation behaviour may be adaptive, enabling assessment of predation risk and hence avoiding ambush predators on flowers.
Micromorphology of egg and larva of Eristalis fratercula, with an updated key of Eristalis species with known third instar larvae (Diptera: Syrphidae)
TLDR
Morphological studies are presented based on cryo-scanning electron microscopy (cryo-SEM) and it is concluded that main diagnostic character of E. fratercula is the presence of long branched spicules located in the upper margin on the lateral lips.
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TLDR
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