Similarities and differences in perceiving threat from dynamic faces and bodies. An fMRI study

@article{Kret2011SimilaritiesAD,
  title={Similarities and differences in perceiving threat from dynamic faces and bodies. An fMRI study},
  author={M. Kret and S. Pichon and J. Gr{\`e}zes and B. Gelder},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2011},
  volume={54},
  pages={1755-1762}
}
Neuroscientific research on the perception of emotional signals has mainly focused on how the brain processes threat signals from photographs of facial expressions. Much less is known about body postures or about the processing of dynamic images. We undertook a systematic comparison of the neurofunctional network dedicated to processing facial and bodily expressions. Two functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) experiments investigated whether areas involved in processing social signals are… Expand
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