Silastic interposition for haemophilic arthropathy of the elbow.

@article{ButlerManuel1990SilasticIF,
  title={Silastic interposition for haemophilic arthropathy of the elbow.},
  author={P. Butler-Manuel and M. Smith and G. Savidge},
  journal={The Journal of bone and joint surgery. British volume},
  year={1990},
  volume={72 3},
  pages={
          472-4
        }
}
Thirteen elbows affected by severe haemophilic arthropathy and treated by silastic interposition arthroplasty were followed up for at least five years. The severity of pain, the frequency and severity of spontaneous haemorrhage and the range of movement were assessed before operation and at review. All patients were much improved and needed less factor replacement. Three elbows were revised, one for infection and two because of fragmentation of the silastic sheet. They regained good function… Expand

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