Sikh Militant Movements in Canada 1

@article{Razavy2006SikhMM,
  title={Sikh Militant Movements in Canada 1},
  author={Maryam Razavy},
  journal={Terrorism and Political Violence},
  year={2006},
  volume={18},
  pages={79 - 93}
}
  • M. Razavy
  • Published 1 March 2006
  • Sociology
  • Terrorism and Political Violence
ABSTRACT This article analyzes the historical formation of three of the most influential Sikh militant movements operating in Canada: the World Sikh Organization (WSO), the International Sikh Youth Federation (ISYF), and the Babbar Khalsa (BK). It traces the historical formation of these three factions, paying particular attention to the mandates and ideological philosophies to which these groups subscribe, as well as their current activities. In addition, it focuses on how the infighting over… 
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