Signs of REM sleep dependent enhancement of implicit face memory: a repetition priming study

@article{Wagner2003SignsOR,
  title={Signs of REM sleep dependent enhancement of implicit face memory: a repetition priming study},
  author={Ullrich Wagner and Manfred Hallschmid and Rolf Verleger and Jan Born},
  journal={Biological Psychology},
  year={2003},
  volume={62},
  pages={197-210}
}

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