Signature of gravity waves in polarization of the microwave background

@article{Seljak1997SignatureOG,
  title={Signature of gravity waves in polarization of the microwave background},
  author={Uros Seljak and Matias Zaldarriaga},
  journal={Physical Review Letters},
  year={1997},
  volume={78},
  pages={2054-2057}
}
Using spin-weighted decomposition of polarization in the cosmic microwave background (CMB) we show that a particular combination of Stokes $Q$ and $U$ parameters vanishes for primordial fluctuations generated by scalar modes, but does not for those generated by primordial gravity waves. Because of this gravity wave detection is not limited by cosmic variance as in the case of temperature fluctuations. We present the exact expressions for various polarization power spectra, which are valid on… 

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