Signaling from the Cytoplasm to the Nucleus in Striatal Medium-Sized Spiny Neurons

@inproceedings{Matamales2011SignalingFT,
  title={Signaling from the Cytoplasm to the Nucleus in Striatal Medium-Sized Spiny Neurons},
  author={Miriam Matamales and J Girault},
  booktitle={Front. Neuroanat.},
  year={2011}
}
Striatal medium-sized spiny neurons (MSNs) receive massive glutamate inputs from the cerebral cortex and thalamus and are a major target of dopamine projections. Interaction between glutamate and dopamine signaling is crucial for the control of movement and reward-driven learning, and its alterations are implicated in several neuropsychiatric disorders including Parkinson's disease and drug addiction. Long-lasting forms of synaptic plasticity are thought to depend on transcription of gene… CONTINUE READING

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