Side effects of creatine supplementation in athletes.

@article{Francaux2006SideEO,
  title={Side effects of creatine supplementation in athletes.},
  author={Marc Francaux and Jacques Remi Poortmans},
  journal={International journal of sports physiology and performance},
  year={2006},
  volume={1 4},
  pages={
          311-23
        }
}
  • M. Francaux, J. Poortmans
  • Published 1 December 2006
  • Medicine
  • International journal of sports physiology and performance
CONTEXT Allegations about side effects of creatine supplementation by athletes have been published in the popular media and scientific publications. PURPOSE To examine the experimental evidence relating to the physiological effects of creatine supplementation. RESULTS One of the purported effects of oral creatine supplementation is increased muscle mass. A review of the literature reveals a 1.0% to 2.3% increase in body mass, which is attributed to fat-free mass and, more specifically, to… 
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TLDR
There were no statistical differences between the control group and the creatine consumer group for plasma contents and urine excretion rates for creatinine, urea, and albumin, and clearances of these compounds did not differ between the two groups.
Long-term creatine supplementation does not significantly affect clinical markers of health in athletes
TLDR
Results indicate that long-term creatine supplementation (up to 21-months) does not appear to adversely effect markers of health status in athletes undergoing intense training in comparison to athletes who do not take creatine.
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It is concluded that short-term CrM supplementation may have anticatabolic actions in some proteins (in men), but CrM does not increase whole body or mixed-muscle protein synthesis.
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TLDR
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TLDR
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TLDR
Creatine supplementation increased muscle total creatine by approximately 21% and exercise increased the synthetic rates of myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic proteins by two- to threefold, and leg phenylalanine balance became more positive, but creatine was without any anabolic effect.
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