Siblings and Suitors in the Narrative Architecture of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall

@article{OToole1999SiblingsAS,
  title={Siblings and Suitors in the Narrative Architecture of The Tenant of Wildfell Hall},
  author={Tess O’Toole},
  journal={SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900},
  year={1999},
  volume={39},
  pages={715 - 731}
}
  • Tess O’Toole
  • Published 1 November 1999
  • Sociology
  • SEL Studies in English Literature 1500-1900
Anne Bronte's 7he Tenant of Wildfell Hall has been singled out most frequently for two elements: (1) its unusually complicated framing device (Gilbert Markham's epistolary account of his relationship with Helen Huntingdon surrounds her much lengthier diary account of her first marriage and flight from her husband) and (2) its strikingly frank and detailed description of a woman's experience in an abusive marriage. These two features of the text, one formal and one thematic, are intertwined in… 
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List of Illustrations. Acknowledgements. Introduction. 1. Childhood. 2. A Great Delight. 3. Roe Head. 4. Disaster and Sunrise. 5. Thorp Green, 1840. 6. The End of Romantic Hopes. 7. Branwell Joins
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