Siblicide in Serengeti spotted hyenas: a long-term study of maternal input and cub survival

@article{Hofer2007SiblicideIS,
  title={Siblicide in Serengeti spotted hyenas: a long-term study of maternal input and cub survival},
  author={Heribert Hofer and Marion L. East},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2007},
  volume={62},
  pages={341-351}
}
  • H. Hofer, M. East
  • Published 2007
  • Environmental Science
  • Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology
In the Serengeti National Park, Tanzania, large fluctuations of prey abundance alters the frequency at which spotted hyena (Crocuta crocuta) cubs are nursed and thus the total level of maternal input available to them. Maternal input is high when mothers feed on high densities of locally available migratory herbivores and low when mothers travel up to 70 km to forage. Using data from 19 cub cohorts on the incidence of siblicide (from monitoring the survival of 609 cubs in twin litters) and cub… 
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In spotted hyaenas, Crocuta crocuta, aggression rates between siblings were highest when cubs competed for access to maternal milk, and aggression rates declined with age and increasing reproductive value of siblings.
Maternal rank is not correlated with cub survival in the spotted hyena, Crocuta crocuta
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TLDR
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TLDR
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Sibling competition in guinea pigs (Cavia aperea f. porcellus): scrambling for mother’s teats is stressful
TLDR
Sibling competition in the domestic guinea pig (Cavia aperea f. porcellus), which has two teats, but frequently bears litters of up to five pups, is studied to fit better with models of scramble competition than with those of honest signalling.
Do newborn domestic rabbits Oryctolagus cuniculus compete for thermally advantageous positions in the litter huddle?
TLDR
In newborn rabbits, competition for the mother’s milk exists alongside mutual “cooperative” benefits of littermate presence, and it is concluded that rather than competing for thermally advantageous positions within the huddle newborn rabbits share out thermologically advantageous positions as they move in a continual dynamic flow through it.
The commuting system of Serengeti spotted hyaenas: how a predator copes with migratory prey. I. Social organization
Abstract Abstract. The social organization and space use of spotted hyaenas, Crocuta crocuta Erxleben, in the Serengeti, Tanzania is described. In contrast to Kruuk (1972, The Spotted Hyena. Chicago:
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