Should you stop wearing neckties?—wearing a tight necktie reduces cerebral blood flow

@article{Lddecke2018ShouldYS,
  title={Should you stop wearing neckties?—wearing a tight necktie reduces cerebral blood flow},
  author={Robin L{\"u}ddecke and Thomas Lindner and Julia Forstenpointner and Ralf Baron and Olav Jansen and Janne Gierthm{\"u}hlen},
  journal={Neuroradiology},
  year={2018},
  volume={60},
  pages={861-864}
}
PurposeNegative cerebrovascular effects can be expected by compressing jugular veins and carotids by a necktie. It was already demonstrated that a necktie increases intraocular pressure. In many professions, a special dress code including a necktie and a collared shirt is mandatory although little is known about the effect of this “socially desirable strangulation.”MethodsIn this study, the effect of wearing a necktie concerning cerebral blood flow and jugular venous flow by magnetic resonance… 
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Zur neurovaskulären Problematik von Krawatten
Korrespondenzadresse Prof. Dr. Dr. Manfred Spitzer, Universitätsklinikum Ulm Klinik für Psychiatrie und Psychotherapie III Leimgrubenweg 12, 89075 Ulm Mein Freund Eckart von Hirschhausen wusste es
2018/2019
TLDR
The Willebrand Factor regulating protein self-association under hydrodynamic regulating human leukocyte adhesion to inflamed endothelial cells and the role of calcium is studied using novel FRET probes are supported.

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