Should the science of adolescent brain development inform public policy?

@article{Steinberg2009ShouldTS,
  title={Should the science of adolescent brain development inform public policy?},
  author={L. Steinberg},
  journal={The American psychologist},
  year={2009},
  volume={64 8},
  pages={
          739-50
        }
}
  • L. Steinberg
  • Published 2009
  • Psychology, Engineering, Medicine
  • The American psychologist
One factor that has contributed to confusion in discussions of the use of adolescent neuroscience in the development of public policies affecting young people is a blurring of three very different issues that need to be separated: (a) what science does and does not say about brain development in adolescence; (b) what neuroscience does and does not imply for the understanding of adolescent behavior; and (c) what these implications suggest for public policy. In this article, the author argues… Expand
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