Should the Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Child and Adolescent Depression Be Banned?

@article{Cohen2006ShouldTU,
  title={Should the Use of Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors in Child and Adolescent Depression Be Banned?},
  author={David Cohen},
  journal={Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics},
  year={2006},
  volume={76},
  pages={5 - 14}
}
  • D. Cohen
  • Published 1 December 2006
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
Background: European and US pharmaceutical agencies have recently warned against the use of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) in child and adolescent depression. This came as a surprise to many practitioners, who had made treatment decisions based on data from pharmaceutical trials using adult samples. Method: The author reviews the recent literature relevant to the use of SSRIs in youth depression, including psychiatricclinical trials, pharmacology and drug safety data… 
SSRI-Induced Activation Syndrome in Children and Adolescents—What Is Next?
Opinion statementAntidepressants are being increasingly prescribed for children and adolescents for the treatment of depression, anxiety, and other mental disorders. The selective serotonin reuptake
SSRIs have a smaller benefit in paediatric when compared to adult major depressive disorder
  • L. Sher
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Evidence-Based Mental Health
  • 2016
TLDR
The authors searched PubMed and CENTRAL for randomised controlled trials which compared SSRIs to placebo for the treatment of major depressive disorder and found no consistency in the results.
New-Generation Antidepressants, Suicide and Depressed Adolescents: How Should Clinicians Respond to Changing Evidence?
TLDR
Better evidence is required regarding psychological treatments, clinical course, and clinical practice trends, and in moderate–severe depression the risk of suicide if NGAs are not used may outweigh any risk of self-harm associated with them.
Management of Adverse Effects of Second-generation Antipsychotics in Youth
TLDR
Short-term and long-term adverse effects of SGAs in youth populations are exposed and management recommendations for major adverse effects are provided to aid clinicians in making treatment decisions.
Trends in prescriptions for antidepressant pharmacotherapy among US children and adolescents diagnosed with depression, 1990 through 2001: an assessment of accordance with treatment recommendations from the American Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry.
TLDR
From 1990 through 2001, prescription patterns for antidepressant pharmacotherapy among children and adolescents aged 5 to 18 years changed in accordance with the recommendation made by the AACAP in 1998, prescriptions for SSRIs increased, whereas prescriptions for TCAs all but disappeared.
Adverse Effects of Second-Generation Antipsychotics in Children and Adolescents: A Bayesian Meta-Analysis
TLDR
It is concluded that short-term metabolic effects and EPS are frequent in children treated with SGAs and second-generation antipsychotics should be considered in treatment decisions.
Predictors of placebo response in randomized controlled trials of psychotropic drugs for children and adolescents with internalizing disorders.
TLDR
Predictors of placebo response in internalizing disorders of youths parallel those in adult studies, with the exception of race, and should be considered when designing placebo-controlled trials in youths to enhance findings of true drug-placebo differences.
Key Opinion Leaders and Paediatric Antidepressant Overprescribing
TLDR
How industry and key opinion leaders have distorted the clinician’s perception of the safety and usefulness of antidepressants for the treatment of depression in children and adolescents through publication bias, poor methodology, and selective reporting is explained.
Excessive Mood Elevation and Behavioral Activation with Antidepressant Treatment of Juvenile Depressive and Anxiety Disorders: A Systematic Review
TLDR
Risks of excessive mood elevation during antidepressant treatment, including mania-hypomania, were much greater than with placebo, and similar in juvenile anxiety and depressive disorders, and calls for particular caution and monitoring.
Medication use in adolescents treated in a French psychiatric setting for acute manic or mixed episode.
  • A. Consoli, J. Brunelle, +4 authors D. Cohen
  • Medicine
    Journal of the Canadian Academy of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry = Journal de l'Academie canadienne de psychiatrie de l'enfant et de l'adolescent
  • 2009
OBJECTIVE In the absence of recommendations from drug regulatory agencies for most medications to treat severe manic or mixed episode in adolescence, this study aims to (i) describe the
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 92 REFERENCES
Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors in childhood depression: systematic review of published versus unpublished data
TLDR
A meta-analysis of data from randomised controlled trials that evaluated an SSRI versus placebo in participants aged 5-18 years and that were published in a peer-reviewed journal or were unpublished and included in a review by the Committee on Safety of Medicines indicated that risks could outweigh benefits of these drugs to treat depression in children and young people.
Lines of Evidence on the Risks of Suicide with Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors
  • D. Healy
  • Psychology, Medicine
    Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
  • 2003
TLDR
The data reviewed here indicate a possible doubling of the relative risk of both suicides and suicide attempts on SSRIs compared with older antidepressants or non-treatment, which makes it difficult to sustain a null hypothesis, i.e. that SSRis do not cause problems in some individuals to whom they are given.
Efficacy of sertraline in the treatment of children and adolescents with major depressive disorder: two randomized controlled trials.
TLDR
The results of this pooled analysis demonstrate that sertraline is an effective and well-tolerated short-term treatment for children and adolescents with MDD.
Efficacy and safety of antidepressants for children and adolescents
TLDR
Of seven published randomised controlled trials of newer antidepressants for depressed children published in refereed journals, six used a placebo control and the extent to which authors' conclusions were supported by data was analysed.
Paroxetine versus clomipramine in adolescents with severe major depression: a double-blind, randomized, multicenter trial.
TLDR
Paroxetine and clomipramine exhibit similar efficacy in adolescent depression, and these data support the serotonin hypothesis but do not confirm it in the absence of a placebo arm.
Age may affect response to antidepressants with serotonergic and noradrenergic actions.
TLDR
Young adults had a poorer response to noradrenergic antidepressants than they did to serotonergic antidepressants, whereas there was no differential response in the older age group, suggesting that age may be one factor to consider when choosing antidepressants for patients.
A randomized, placebo-controlled trial of citalopram for the treatment of major depression in children and adolescents.
TLDR
Treatment with citalopram reduced depressive symptoms to a significantly greater extent than placebo treatment and was well tolerated in this population of children and adolescents.
Platelet serotonin reuptake inhibition and response to SSRIs in depressed adolescents.
TLDR
Improvement in depressive symptoms as rated with the CGI improvement subscale was significantly associated with the percentage change in platelet serotonin reuptake inhibition from pre- to posttreatment, and improvement in depression was also associated with absolute decrease in Platelet serotoninReuptake when adjusted for the magnitude of baseline reuptakes.
Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors and Suicide: Is the Evidence, as with Beauty, in the Eye of the Beholder?
  • R. Balon
  • Medicine, Psychology
    Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics
  • 2003
The recent debate started by David Healy [1] on the pages of this journal and further fueled by letters published in this issue [2–4] sparks again the decade-old debate ‘as to whether selective
Can long-term treatment with antidepressant drugs worsen the course of depression?
  • G. Fava
  • Psychology, Medicine
    The Journal of clinical psychiatry
  • 2003
TLDR
The possibility that antidepressant drugs may worsen the course of depression needs to be tested, even though its scientific exploration is likely to encounter considerable methodological and ideological difficulties.
...
1
2
3
4
5
...