Should We be Concerned About the Rapid Increase in CT Usage?

@article{Brenner2010ShouldWB,
  title={Should We be Concerned About the Rapid Increase in CT Usage?},
  author={D. Brenner},
  journal={Reviews on Environmental Health},
  year={2010},
  volume={25},
  pages={63 - 68}
}
  • D. Brenner
  • Published 2010
  • Medicine
  • Reviews on Environmental Health
  • There has been a rapid increase in the population dose from medical radiation within the last 20 years, particularly due to the increase in CT usage. Currently, about 65 million adult and 5 million pediatric CT exams are being performed in the US each year. CT-related x-ray doses are small, but very much larger than for most conventional radiological examinations. CT-related x-ray doses are large enough that there is statistically-significant epidemiological evidence of a small increase in… CONTINUE READING
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