Should We Impose Quotas? Evaluating the “Disparate Impact” Argument against Legalization of Assisted Suicide

@article{Lindsay2002ShouldWI,
  title={Should We Impose Quotas? Evaluating the “Disparate Impact” Argument against Legalization of Assisted Suicide},
  author={Ronald A. Lindsay},
  journal={The Journal of Law, Medicine \& Ethics},
  year={2002},
  volume={30},
  pages={16 - 6}
}
  • R. Lindsay
  • Published 1 March 2002
  • Sociology, Medicine
  • The Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
Prominent among the arguments against the legalization of assisted suicide is the contention that legalization will have a disproportionately adverse, or “disparate,” impact on various vulnerable groups. There are many versions of this argument, with different advocates of this argument focusing on different vulnerable groups, and some advocates confusedly blending slippery slope and social justice concerns. Also, the weight placed on this argument by its various advocates is not uniform, with… 
The “Disparate Impact” Argument Reconsidered: Making Room for Justice in the Assisted Suicide Debate
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  • Medicine
    Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
  • 2002
TLDR
It should make no difference to the debate over legalizing assisted suicide whether the risks associated with legalization would fall disproportionately on the poor, people with disabilities, racial minorities, or any other especially vulnerable social group, Ronald Lindsay argues.
Legal Status of Physician-Assisted Suicide
TLDR
A century of end of-life jurisprudence in the United States provides the fundamental framework for understanding the differences among end-of-life options and provides an ethical framework for debates over assisted death.
Legislating Privilege
TLDR
Questions are raised about how compelling are arguments that the authors ought to legalize assisted suicide out of feelings of mercy for the sick and dying, when such affective expressions may actually be the socially acceptable manifestation of private ambivalence that includes merciless discrimination.
Oregon's Experience: Evaluating the Record
  • R. Lindsay
  • Medicine
    The American journal of bioethics : AJOB
  • 2009
TLDR
To the extent projected harmful consequences are relevant to the debate over legalization, Oregon's experience argues in favor of legalization of assistance in dying.
The Need to Specify the Difference “Difference” Makes
  • R. Lindsay
  • Medicine, Political Science
    Journal of Law, Medicine & Ethics
  • 2002
TLDR
In replying to commentaries that take me to task for allegedly misinterpreting what I label the disparate impact argument against assisted suicide, I should begin by claiming that I have been misinterpreted, but it is important to be clear about the claims and the scope of my arguments.
Hospice or Hemlock? Searching for Heroic Compassion
  • L. Post
  • Medicine
    Annals of Internal Medicine
  • 2003
TLDR
The unsurprising conclusion is that hospice and hemlock are each an incomplete answer to the question of what dying patients can and should expect from their physicians.
Why Should We Be Concerned About Disparate Impact?
  • R. Lindsay
  • Political Science, Medicine
    The American journal of bioethics : AJOB
  • 2006

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