Should Dyspareunia Be Retained as a Sexual Dysfunction in DSM-V? A Painful Classification Decision

@article{Binik2005ShouldDB,
  title={Should Dyspareunia Be Retained as a Sexual Dysfunction in DSM-V? A Painful Classification Decision},
  author={Yitzchak M. Binik},
  journal={Archives of Sexual Behavior},
  year={2005},
  volume={34},
  pages={11-21}
}
  • Y. Binik
  • Published 1 February 2005
  • Psychology, Medicine
  • Archives of Sexual Behavior
The DSM-IV-TR (American Psychiatric Association, 2000) classifies dyspareunia as a sexual dysfunction and describes it as a “sexual pain” disorder. This classification has been widely accepted with little controversy despite the absence of a theoretical rationale or supporting empirical data. An examination of the validity of this classification suggests that there is little current justification for the use of the term “sexual pain” or for considering dyspareunia a sexual dysfunction… 
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