Shot by the Messenger: Partisan Cues and Public Opinion Regarding National Security and War

@article{Baum2009ShotBT,
  title={Shot by the Messenger: Partisan Cues and Public Opinion Regarding National Security and War},
  author={Matthew A. Baum and Tim J. Groeling},
  journal={Political Behavior},
  year={2009},
  volume={31},
  pages={157-186}
}
Research has shown that messages of intra-party harmony tend to be ignored by the news media, while internal disputes, especially within the governing party, generally receive prominent coverage. We examine how messages of party conflict and cooperation affect public opinion regarding national security, as well as whether and how the reputations of media outlets matter. We develop a typology of partisan messages in the news, determining their likely effects based on the characteristics of the… 
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