Short-distance dispersal of black coral larvae: inference from spatial analysis of colony genotypes

@article{Miller1998ShortdistanceDO,
  title={Short-distance dispersal of black coral larvae: inference from spatial analysis of colony genotypes},
  author={Karen Joy Miller},
  journal={Marine Ecology Progress Series},
  year={1998},
  volume={163},
  pages={225-233}
}
  • K. Miller
  • Published 12 March 1998
  • Environmental Science
  • Marine Ecology Progress Series
Ant~pathes fiordensis is a black coral species endermc to the south western reglon of New Zealand Restncted larval dlspersal has been demonstrated to occur In A fiordens~s although the exact scale of larval dlspersal is unknown Thls study examlnes the fine-scale (<50 m) pattern of relatedness between black coral colonles at 3 sltes in Doubtful Sound Fiordland to mfer dspersa l &stance and gain a better understanding of patch size in this species At each of the 3 sites the position of all black… 

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...

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