• Corpus ID: 706431

Short communication Restoring Yellowstone ’ s aspen with wolves

@inproceedings{Ripple2007ShortCR,
  title={Short communication Restoring Yellowstone ’ s aspen with wolves},
  author={William J. Ripple and Robert L. Beschta},
  year={2007}
}
Wolves (Canis lupus) were reintroduced to Yellowstone National Park in 1995–1996. We present data on a recent trophic cascade involving wolves, elk (Cervus elaphus), and aspen (Populus tremuloides) in Yellowstone’s northern winter range that documents the first significant growth of aspen in over half a century. Results indicate reduced browsing and increased heights of young aspen during the last 4–5 years, particularly at high predation risk sites (riparian areas with downed logs). In… 

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References

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