Shoot, shovel and shut up: cryptic poaching slows restoration of a large carnivore in Europe

@article{Liberg2011ShootSA,
  title={Shoot, shovel and shut up: cryptic poaching slows restoration of a large carnivore in Europe},
  author={O. Liberg and G. Chapron and Petter Wabakken and H. Pedersen and N. T. Hobbs and H. Sand},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences},
  year={2011},
  volume={279},
  pages={910 - 915}
}
Poaching is a widespread and well-appreciated problem for the conservation of many threatened species. Because poaching is illegal, there is strong incentive for poachers to conceal their activities, and consequently, little data on the effects of poaching on population dynamics are available. Quantifying poaching mortality should be a required knowledge when developing conservation plans for endangered species but is hampered by methodological challenges. We show that rigorous estimates of the… Expand
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