Shifts in the Genetic Landscape of the Western Eurasian Steppe Associated with the Beginning and End of the Scythian Dominance

@article{Jrve2019ShiftsIT,
  title={Shifts in the Genetic Landscape of the Western Eurasian Steppe Associated with the Beginning and End of the Scythian Dominance},
  author={Mari J{\"a}rve and Lehti Saag and Christiana Lyn Scheib and Ajai K Pathak and Francesco Montinaro and Luca Pagani and Rodrigo Flores and Meriam Guellil and Lauri Saag and Kristiina Tambets and Alena Kushniarevich and Anu Solnik and Liivi Varul and Stanislav Zadnikov and Oleg Petrauskas and Maryana Avramenko and Boris Magomedov and Serghii Didenko and Gennadi Toshev and Igor V. Bruyako and Denys Grechko and V. N. Okatenko and Kyrylo Gorbenko and O. I. Smyrnov and Anatolii Heiko and Roman Reida and Serheii Sapiehin and Sergey V. Sirotin and Aleksandr Tairov and Arman Z Beisenov and Maksim Starodubtsev and Vitaliy Vasilev and Alexei Nechvaloda and Biyaslan Atabiev and Sergey Litvinov and Natalia Ekomasova and Murat Dzhaubermezov and Sergey Voroniatov and O. M. Utevska and Irina Shramko and Elza K. Khusnutdinova and Mait Metspalu and Nikita Savelev and Aivar Kriiska and Toomas Kivisild and Richard Villems},
  journal={Current Biology},
  year={2019},
  volume={29},
  pages={2430-2441.e10}
}
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