Shifts in mycorrhizal fungi during the evolution of autotrophy to mycoheterotrophy in Cymbidium (Orchidaceae).

@article{OguraTsujita2012ShiftsIM,
  title={Shifts in mycorrhizal fungi during the evolution of autotrophy to mycoheterotrophy in Cymbidium (Orchidaceae).},
  author={Y. Ogura-Tsujita and J. Yokoyama and K. Miyoshi and T. Yukawa},
  journal={American journal of botany},
  year={2012},
  volume={99 7},
  pages={
          1158-76
        }
}
PREMISE OF THE STUDY Mycoheterotrophic plants, which completely depend upon mycorrhizal fungi for their nutrient supply, have unusual associations with fungal partners. The processes involved in shifts in fungal associations during cladogenesis of plant partners from autotrophy to mycoheterotrophy have not been demonstrated using a robust phylogenetic framework. METHODS Consequences of a mycorrhizal shift were examined in Cymbidium (Orchidaceae) using achlorophyllous and sister chlorophyllous… Expand
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