Shift from intravenous or 16% subcutaneous replacement therapy to 20% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with primary antibody deficiencies

@article{Canessa2017ShiftFI,
  title={Shift from intravenous or 16\% subcutaneous replacement therapy to 20\% subcutaneous immunoglobulin in patients with primary antibody deficiencies},
  author={Clementina Canessa and Jessica Iacopelli and Antonio Pecoraro and Giuseppe Spadaro and Andrea Matucci and Cinzia Milito and Alessandra Vultaggio and Carlo Agostini and Francesco Cinetto and Maria Giovanna Danieli and Simona Gambini and Carolina Marasco and Antonino Trizzino and Angelo Vacca and Domenico De Mattia and Baldassarre Martire and Alessandro Plebani and Mario Di Gioacchino and Alessia Gatta and Andrea Finocchi and Francesco Licciardi and S. Martino and Marco de Carli and Viviana Moschese and Chiara Azzari},
  journal={International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacology},
  year={2017},
  volume={30},
  pages={73 - 82}
}
In patients with primary antibody deficiencies, subcutaneous administration of IgG (SCIG) replacement is effective, safe, well-tolerated, and can be self-administered at home. A new SCIG replacement at 20% concentration (Hizentra®) has been developed and has replaced Vivaglobin® (SCIG 16%). An observational prospective multi-centric open-label study, with retrospective comparison was conducted in 15 Italian centers, in order to investigate whether and to what extent switching to Hizentra® would… 

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