Sheep self-medicate when challenged with illness-inducing foods

@article{Villalba2006SheepSW,
  title={Sheep self-medicate when challenged with illness-inducing foods},
  author={Juan J. Villalba and Frederick D. Provenza and Ryan A. Shaw},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2006},
  volume={71},
  pages={1131-1139}
}
People learn to take aspirin for headaches, antacids for stomach aches and ibuprofen to relieve pain, and often obtain prescriptions from doctors for medications. Is it also possible that herbivores write their own prescriptions? From prehistoric times, people have looked to the presumed self-medicative behaviour of animals for remedies of ailments but it is still not clear whether animals seek medicinal compounds to recuperate from illness. Evidence of self-medication is based almost… Expand
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