Sheep in wolf's clothing: multicomponent traits enhance the success of mimicry in spider-mimicking moths

@article{Wang2017SheepIW,
  title={Sheep in wolf's clothing: multicomponent traits enhance the success of mimicry in spider-mimicking moths},
  author={M. Wang and Vera Vasas and L. Chittka and Shen-horn Yen},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2017},
  volume={127},
  pages={219-224}
}
  • M. Wang, Vera Vasas, +1 author Shen-horn Yen
  • Published 2017
  • Biology
  • Animal Behaviour
  • Predator mimicry occurs when prey resemble their predator to gain protection. We explored the relative importance of the morphological and locomotor signals that spider-mimicking moths use to deceive their jumping spider predators. Two hypotheses explain why animals use multicomponent signals for communication: the ‘back-up signal’ hypothesis which suggests that multiple traits increase accuracy, and the ‘multiple message’ hypothesis which suggests that the different traits serve different… CONTINUE READING
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