Sheep cloned by nuclear transfer from a cultured cell line

@article{Campbell1996SheepCB,
  title={Sheep cloned by nuclear transfer from a cultured cell line},
  author={Keith Henry Stockman Campbell and Jim Mcwhir and William A. Ritchie and Ian Wilmut},
  journal={Nature},
  year={1996},
  volume={380},
  pages={64-66}
}
NUCLEAR transfer has been used in mammals as both a valuable tool in embryological studies1 and as a method for the multiplication of 'elite' embryos2–4. Offspring have only been reported when early embryos, or embryo-derived cells during primary culture, were used as nuclear donors5,6. Here we provide the first report, to our knowledge, of live mammalian offspring following nuclear transfer from an established cell line. Lambs were born after cells derived from sheep embryos, which had been… 
Cloned pigs produced by nuclear transfer from adult somatic cells
TLDR
The successful production of cloned piglets from a cultured adult somatic cell population using a new nuclear transfer procedure is reported and the methodology used for embryo reconstruction in each of these species is essentially similar.
Animal Cloning : Reprogramming the Donor Genome
TLDR
Success rates remain low in all species, with published data showing that only 1% to 5% of reconstructed embryos result in l i ve b i r t hs ( see Ros l i n I ns t i t u te web s i t e).
Cloning and Transgenesis in Cattle: Potential Applications
TLDR
In bovine, somatic cloning has been proven to be feasible from several types of cells taken on a live valuable cow or bull, andGene targetting in cultured somatic cells through homologous recombination becomes possible in domestic species.
Mice cloned from embryonic stem cells.
TLDR
It is shown that late-passage ES cells can be used to produce viable cloned mice and provide a link between the technologies of ES cells and animal cloning, suggesting that it may be possible to clone from a single cell a large number of individuals over an extended period.
Production of cloned lambs from an established embryonic cell line: a comparison between in vivo- and in vitro-matured cytoplasts.
TLDR
DNA microsatellite markers conclusively show that the three lambs are genetically identical and were derived from the embryonic cell line, and some cells from this blastocyst-derived embryonic cellline are totipotent by nuclear transfer and can produce viable offspring.
Experimental cloning of embryos through human-rabbit inter-species nuclear transfer
TLDR
Cloned embryos can be constructed through human-rabbit interspecies nuclear transfer; different kinds of somatic cells result in different efficiency of nuclear transfer, while in vitro passage of the donor does not influence embryo development; refrigeration is a convenient and efficient donor cell preparation method.
Experimental cloning of embryos through human-rabbit inter-species nuclear transfer
TLDR
Cloned embryos can be constructed through human-rabbit interspecies nuclear transfer; different kinds of somatic cells result in different efficiency of nuclear transfer, while in vitro passage of the donor does not influence embryo development; refrigeration is a convenient and efficient donor cell preparation method.
Production of goats by somatic cell nuclear transfer
TLDR
Analysis of the milk of one of the transgenic cloned animals showed high-level production of human antithrombin III, similar to the parental transgenic line.
Nucleartransferfrom somatic cells: applications in farmanimal species
TLDR
This objective has been achieved with the production of lambs using nuclei from cultured cells established from embryonic, fetal and adult material, and lambs transgenic for human factor IX have been produced from fetal fibroblasts transfected and selected in culture.
...
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 32 REFERENCES
Nuclear transplantation in sheep embryos
TLDR
It is shown that fully viable embryos may be obtained by this procedure and its use to investigate the development of embryos in which whole blastomeres from 8- and 16-cell embryos were combined with enucleated or nucleated halves of unfertilized eggs.
Human factor IX transgenic sheep produced by transfer of nuclei from transfected fetal fibroblasts.
TLDR
Ovine primary fetal fibroblasts were cotransfected with a neomycin resistance marker gene (neo) and a human coagulation factor IX genomic construct designed for expression of the encoded protein in sheep milk and produced viable animals by nuclear transfer.
Embryonic stem cells in farm animals.
TLDR
ES cells have substantial advantages over EC cells in that they can be derived directly from a normal embryo, they maintain a normal karyotype and when reintroduced into a host blastocyst they can colonise the germ line.
Production of calves by transfer of nuclei from cultured inner cell mass cells.
  • M. Sims, N. First
  • Biology, Medicine
    Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 1994
TLDR
The isolation and in vitro culture of bovine inner cell mass (ICM) cells and the use of ICM cells in nuclear transfer to produce totipotent blastocysts that resulted in calves born showed the calves to be derived from the respective sires of the cell lines.
Nuclear transplantation in the mouse embryo by microsurgery and cell fusion.
Nuclear transplantation in the mouse embryo was achieved by using a method that combines microsurgical removal of the zygote pronuclei with the introduction of a donor nucleus by a virus-mediated
Nuclear transfer in mammalian embryos.
Isolation of embryonic cell‐lines from porcine blastocysts
TLDR
The differentiation of these embryonic cell‐lines into several cell types indicates a pluripotential cell, which should be useful for studies of cell differentiation, developme...
Inability of mouse blastomere nuclei transferred to enucleated zygotes to support development in vitro.
TLDR
The inability of cell nuclei from successive preimplantation cleavage stages to support development reflects rapid loss of totipotency of the transferred nucleus and is not the result of simultaneous transfer of membrane or cytoplasm.
...
...