Shattuck Lecture. We can do better--improving the health of the American people.

@article{Schroeder2007ShattuckLW,
  title={Shattuck Lecture. We can do better--improving the health of the American people.},
  author={Steven A. Schroeder},
  journal={The New England journal of medicine},
  year={2007},
  volume={357 12},
  pages={
          1221-8
        }
}
  • S. Schroeder
  • Published 20 September 2007
  • Medicine
  • The New England journal of medicine
In the 117th Shattuck Lecture, Dr. Steven Schroeder asks why the American system fails to deliver a standard of health similar to that observed in many other countries. In his arguments, he focuses on the public health risks of smoking and obesity and how they have been managed. 

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