• Corpus ID: 119541253

Sharp Quantum vs. Classical Query Complexity Separations

@article{Beaudrap2000SharpQV,
  title={Sharp Quantum vs. Classical Query Complexity Separations},
  author={J. Niel de Beaudrap and Richard Cleve and John Watrous},
  journal={arXiv: Quantum Physics},
  year={2000}
}
We obtain the strongest separation between quantum and classical query complexity known to date -- specifically, we define a black-box problem that requires exponentially many queries in the classical bounded-error case, but can be solved exactly in the quantum case with a single query (and a polynomial number of auxiliary operations). The problem is simple to define and the quantum algorithm solving it is also simple when described in terms of certain quantum Fourier transforms (QFTs) that… 

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