Sharing is Caring: Assistive Technology Designs on Thingiverse

@article{Buehler2015SharingIC,
  title={Sharing is Caring: Assistive Technology Designs on Thingiverse},
  author={Erin Buehler and Stacy M. Branham and Abdullah Ali and Jeremy J. Chang and Megan Kelly Hofmann and Amy Hurst and Shaun K. Kane},
  journal={Proceedings of the 33rd Annual ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems},
  year={2015}
}
An increasing number of online communities support the open-source sharing of designs that can be built using rapid prototyping to construct physical objects. In this paper, we examine the designs and motivations for assistive technology found on Thingiverse.com, the largest of these communities at the time of this writing. We present results from a survey of all assistive technology that has been posted to Thingiverse since 2008 and a questionnaire distributed to the designers exploring their… 

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