Shared use of flowers leads to horizontal pathogen transmission

@article{Durrer1994SharedUO,
  title={Shared use of flowers leads to horizontal pathogen transmission},
  author={Stephan Durrer and Paul Schmid-Hempel},
  journal={Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Series B: Biological Sciences},
  year={1994},
  volume={258},
  pages={299 - 302}
}
Plant–pollinator interactions are based on mutual benefits; the plant gains fertilization and the pollinator gains food resources. But aside from providing rewards, flowers can be risky places to visit, for example if a predator ambushes during the feeding/pollination process. Here, we show that pollination may also involve the transmission of pathogens for the pollinators. Experimental evidence is given that a trypanosome parasite, Crithidia bombi, can be horizontally transmitted within… Expand

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