Shared neural resources between left and right interlimb coordination skills: The neural substrate of abstract motor representations

@article{Swinnen2010SharedNR,
  title={Shared neural resources between left and right interlimb coordination skills: The neural substrate of abstract motor representations},
  author={Stephan P. Swinnen and Sophie Vangheluwe and Johan Wagemans and James P. Coxon and Daniel J. Goble and Annouchka Van Impe and Stefan Sunaert and Ronald R. Peeters and Nicole Wenderoth},
  journal={NeuroImage},
  year={2010},
  volume={49},
  pages={2570-2580}
}
Functional magnetic resonance imaging was used to reveal the shared neural resources between movements performed with effectors of the left versus right body side. Prior to scanning, subjects extensively practiced a complex coordination pattern involving cyclical motions of the ipsilateral hand and foot according to a 90 degrees out-of-phase coordination mode. Brain activity associated with this (nonpreferred) coordination pattern was contrasted with pre-existing isodirectional (preferred… Expand
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