Shaping your career to maximize personal satisfaction in the practice of oncology.

@article{Shanafelt2006ShapingYC,
  title={Shaping your career to maximize personal satisfaction in the practice of oncology.},
  author={Tait D. Shanafelt and H. Chung and Heather White and Laurie J. Lyckholm},
  journal={Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology},
  year={2006},
  volume={24 24},
  pages={
          4020-6
        }
}
  • T. Shanafelt, H. Chung, L. Lyckholm
  • Published 20 August 2006
  • Medicine
  • Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology
The practice of oncology can be a source of both great satisfaction and great stress. Although many oncologists experience burnout, depression, and dissatisfaction with work, others experience tremendous career satisfaction and achieve a high overall quality of life. Identifying professional goals, optimizing career fit, identifying and managing stressors specific to practice type, and achieving the optimal personal work-life balance can increase the likelihood of individual oncologists… 

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