Shaped to kill: The evolution of siphonophore tentilla for specialized prey capture in the open ocean

@article{DamianSerrano2020ShapedTK,
  title={Shaped to kill: The evolution of siphonophore tentilla for specialized prey capture in the open ocean},
  author={A. Damian-Serrano and S. Haddock and C. Dunn},
  journal={bioRxiv},
  year={2020}
}
Predator specialization has often been considered an evolutionary ‘dead-end’ due to the constraints associated with the evolution of morphological and functional optimizations throughout the organism. However, in some predators, these changes are localized in separate structures dedicated to prey capture. One of the most extreme cases of this modularity can be observed in siphonophores, a clade of pelagic colonial cnidarians that use tentilla (tentacle side branches armed with nematocysts… Expand
2 Citations
The evolution of siphonophore tentilla for specialized prey capture in the open ocean
TLDR
The results show that siphonophore tentillum morphology has strong evolutionary associations with prey type, and suggest that shifts between prey types are linked to shifts in the morphology, mode of evolution, and evolutionary correlations of tentilla and their nematocysts. Expand
Characterising Functional Venom Profiles of Anthozoans and Medusozoans within Their Ecological Context
TLDR
This review examines the current state of knowledge regarding toxins from anthozoans and highlights that the functional and ecological context of venom has implications for the temporal and spatial expression of protein and peptide toxins within class Anthozoa. Expand

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