Sham device v inert pill: randomised controlled trial of two placebo treatments

@article{Kaptchuk2006ShamDV,
  title={Sham device v inert pill: randomised controlled trial of two placebo treatments},
  author={Ted J. Kaptchuk and William B. Stason and Roger B. Davis and Anna T. R. Legedza and Rosa Schnyer and Catherine E. Kerr and David A. Stone and Bong Hyun Nam and Irving Kirsch and Rose H. Goldman},
  journal={BMJ : British Medical Journal},
  year={2006},
  volume={332},
  pages={391 - 397}
}
Abstract Objective To investigate whether a sham device (a validated sham acupuncture needle) has a greater placebo effect than an inert pill in patients with persistent arm pain. Design A single blind randomised controlled trial created from the two week placebo run-in periods for two nested trials that compared acupuncture and amitriptyline with their respective placebo controls. Comparison of participants who remained on placebo continued beyond the run-in period to the end of the study… 
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