Shakespeare’s Starlings

@article{Fugate2021ShakespearesS,
  title={Shakespeare’s Starlings},
  author={Lauren Fugate and John MacNeill Miller},
  journal={Environmental Humanities},
  year={2021}
}
Scientists, environmentalists, and nature writers often report that all common starlings (Sturnus vulgaris) in North America descend from a flock released in New York City in 1890 by Eugene Schieffelin, a man obsessed with importing all the birds mentioned by Shakespeare. This article uses the methods of literary history to investigate this popular anecdote. Today starlings are much despised as an invasive species that displaces native birds and does almost a billion dollars worth of damage… 
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Global invasion history and native decline of the common starling: insights through genetics

Few invasive birds are as globally successful as the Common or European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris). Native to the Palearctic, the starling has been intentionally introduced to North and South

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