Sexual selection in females

@article{CluttonBrock2009SexualSI,
  title={Sexual selection in females},
  author={Tim H. Clutton‐Brock},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={2009},
  volume={77},
  pages={3-11}
}
Darwin developed the theory of sexual selection to account for the evolution of weaponry, ornamentation and other secondary sexual characters that are commonly more developed in males and which appeared unlikely to contribute to survival. He argued that these traits had evolved either through intrasexual competition between males to monopolize access to females or through consistent female preferences for mating with superior partners. Since 1871, a substantial body of research has confirmed… Expand
The evolution of female ornaments and weaponry: social selection, sexual selection and ecological competition
TLDR
It is shown that selection often falls outside the limits of traditional sexual selection theory, particularly in females, and it is concluded that the evolution of these traits in both sexes is best understood within the unifying framework of social selection. Expand
The sexual selection paradigm: have we overlooked other mechanisms in the evolution of male ornaments?
TLDR
It is shown that a male ornament that is traditionally assumed to be sexually selected—the red nuptial coloration of the three-spined stickleback—is under stronger selection for offspring survival than for mating success, which contradicts earlier assumptions and suggests that social selection for youngster survival rather than for sexual selection for matingSuccess is the main mechanism maintaining the ornament in the population. Expand
Reproductive skew and selection on female ornamentation in social species
TLDR
The socially diverse African starlings (Sturnidae) are used to demonstrate that the degree of sexual dimorphism in plumage and body size is reduced in cooperatively breeding species as a result of increased selection on females for traits that increase access to reproductive opportunities, other resources, or higher social status. Expand
Intrasexual competition in females: evidence for sexual selection?
  • K. Rosvall
  • Medicine, Biology
  • Behavioral ecology : official journal of the International Society for Behavioral Ecology
  • 2011
TLDR
Understanding sex differences in sexual selection will require further exploration of the extent of mutual intrasexual competition and the incorporation of quality of mating success into the study of sexual selection in both sexes. Expand
Reproductive competition promotes the evolution of female weaponry
TLDR
Evidence is presented that female body size and horn size in O. sagittarius are under directional selection via competition for reproductive resources, a rare example of female contest competition selecting for female weaponry. Expand
Sexual selection maintains a female-specific character in a species with dynamic sex roles
TLDR
The results indicate that even brief and circumscribed periods of intrasexual competition among females can lead to sexual selection on morphological characters and that this selection may not depend on multiple mating. Expand
The evolution of female sex pheromones
TLDR
It is suggested that the three selection types acting on sex pheromones of female moths are not mutually exclusive but rather act together to promote different fitness components in diverse ecological situations. Expand
Sexual Selection and Female Competition
Sexual selection studies have traditionally focused on reproductive competition as a typical male characteristic, and regarded females as largely passive. However, empirical evidence now shows femaleExpand
Male-Biased Mate Competition in King Penguin Trio Parades
TLDR
It is concluded that intrasexual selection in this colony follows the typical pattern of mate competition observed in species in which sexual dimorphisms and OSR are male biased, and the ultraviolet difference within the framework of the king penguins' colour perception is discussed. Expand
Male mate choice, male quality, and the potential for sexual selection on female traits under polygyny
TLDR
It is demonstrated that, contrary to common inferences, male mate choice, variation in male quality (in the form of a direct fecundity benefit to females), and female ornamentation can coexist in a population without any sexual selection onfemale ornamentation taking place at all. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...

References

SHOWING 1-10 OF 371 REFERENCES
Intrasexual competition and sexual selection in cooperative mammals
TLDR
It is shown that females gain greater benefits from acquiring dominant status than males and traits that increase competitive ability exert a stronger influence on their breeding success, and the extent to which competition for breeding opportunities between females can affect the evolution of sex differences and the operation of sexual selection. Expand
Female Ornaments: Genetically Correlated or Sexually Selected?
TLDR
Recent theoretical research predicts that sexual selection on females should be expected under certain social and ecological circumstances, and empiricists have provided evidence that female traits are relatively unconstrained by the genetic correlation. Expand
Sexual selection and mating systems
  • S. Shuster
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences
  • 2009
TLDR
This empirical framework identifies selective forces and genetic architectures responsible for observed male-female differences, it compliments discoveries of nucleotide sequence variation and the expression of quantitative traits and is easier to test and interpret than frameworks emphasizing parental investment in offspring and its presumed evolutionary outcomes. Expand
SIGNAL TRAIT SEXUAL DIMORPHISM AND MUTUAL SEXUAL SELECTION IN DROSOPHILA SERRATA
TLDR
The evolution of sexual dimorphism in D. serrata appears to have been achieved by sex-limited expression of traits controlled by genes on the X chromosome and is likely to be in its final stages. Expand
Function of weaponry in females: the use of horns in intrasexual competition for resources in female Soay sheep
TLDR
It is demonstrated that a trait that confers benefits to males during intrasexual competition for mates may also be used by females in intraseSexual competition over resources: males use weaponry to gain mates, whereas females use weaponry in order to gain food. Expand
The evolution of male mate choice in insects: a synthesis of ideas and evidence
  • R. Bonduriansky
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Biological reviews of the Cambridge Philosophical Society
  • 2001
TLDR
The empirical evidence and theory pertaining to the evolution of male mate choice and sex role reversal in insects are synthesized, and the potential for male mating p to generate sexual selection on female phenotypes is examined. Expand
Sexual Selection in Males and Females
TLDR
It is shown that both intrasexual competition between females and male choice of mating partners are common, leading to strong sexual selection in females and, in extreme cases, to reversals in the usual pattern of sex differences in behavior and morphology. Expand
Sexually selected females in the monogamous Western Australian seahorse
TLDR
It is provided empirical documentation that sexual selection can also act strongly on females in a natural population with a monogamous mating system, and indicates that substantial sexual selection on females is a potentially important but under-appreciated evolutionary phenomenon in monogamous species. Expand
Male mate choice selects for female coloration in a fish
  • T. Amundsen, E. Forsgren
  • Biology, Medicine
  • Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
  • 2001
TLDR
Examination of mate-choice experiments with two-spotted gobies provides experimental evidence that males prefer ornamented females in a fish that is not sex-role reversed, supporting the hypothesis that female ornamentation is sexually selected. Expand
Potential Reproductive Rates and the Operation of Sexual Selection
TLDR
This framework for relating sex differences in mating competition to the operational sex ratio, potential reproductive rates, and parental expenditure differs from Triver's concept of the relation between parental investment and mating competition in three ways. Expand
...
1
2
3
4
5
...