Sexual selection and the evolution of bird song: A test of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis

@article{Read2004SexualSA,
  title={Sexual selection and the evolution of bird song: A test of the Hamilton-Zuk hypothesis},
  author={A. Read and D. Weary},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={2004},
  volume={26},
  pages={47-56}
}
SummaryHamilton and Zuk (1982) suggested that secondary sexual characters evolve because they allow females to assess a potential mate's ability to resist parasites. A prediction of this theory is that the degree of elaboration of secondary sexual characters should be positively correlated with parasite load across species. In support of their hypothesis, Hamilton and Zuk reported a correlation across North American passerine species between haematozoa prevalence and both brightness and song… Expand

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