Sexual selection and peripatric speciation: the Kaneshiro model revisited

@article{Odeen2002SexualSA,
  title={Sexual selection and peripatric speciation: the Kaneshiro model revisited},
  author={Anders Ödeen and Ann-Britt Florin},
  journal={Journal of Evolutionary Biology},
  year={2002},
  volume={15}
}
The Kaneshiro model proposes a role for sexual selection in peripatric speciation. During population bottlenecks, derived males lose attractive traits and become discriminated against by ancestral females, whereas derived females are selected to be less choosy. This permits novel mate choice cues to evolve in derived populations. In a quantitative analysis of laboratory experiments, we show that bottlenecked males have indeed become less attractive, but females have not lost their ancestral… 

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