Sexual selection, male morphology, and the efficacy of courtship signalling in two wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae)

@article{Scheffer1996SexualSM,
  title={Sexual selection, male morphology, and the efficacy of courtship signalling in two wolf spiders (Araneae: Lycosidae)},
  author={Sonja J. Scheffer and George W. Uetz and Gaff E. Stratton},
  journal={Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology},
  year={1996},
  volume={38},
  pages={17-23}
}
Abstract Males of the brush-legged wolf spider, Schizocosa ocreata (Araneae: Lycosidae), possess a conspicuous male secondary sexual character: dark pigmentation and tufts of bristles on the tibiae of their forelegs. We tested several hypotheses relating to the role of this conspicuous trait in sexual selection. Triad mating experiments suggest that the tufts do not play an obvious role in the operation of sexual selection by either male competition or female choice, as there were no… 

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Results suggest that asymmetry in a key male secondary character used in visual signaling, independent of any concomitant behavioral or size factor, is an important criterion in mate choice.
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