Sexual differences in reproductive effort: time-activity budgets of monogamous killdeer, Charadrius vociferus

@article{Brunton1988SexualDI,
  title={Sexual differences in reproductive effort: time-activity budgets of monogamous killdeer, Charadrius vociferus
},
  author={Dianne H. Brunton},
  journal={Animal Behaviour},
  year={1988},
  volume={36},
  pages={705-717}
}
  • D. Brunton
  • Published 1 June 1988
  • Biology, Environmental Science
  • Animal Behaviour

Energy expenditure in reproductive effect of male and female killdeer (Charadrius vociferus)

The energy expenditure strategies of male and female Killdeer (Charadrius vociferus), a monogamous plover, are compared in relation to the adaptive value of bi-parental care and monogamy for shorebirds and predictions are that females will tend to invest more than males in the parental effort, including egg production, for any given clutch and males will Tend toInvest more than females in mating effort.

Breeding behaviour of the Bearded Vulture Gypaetus barbatus: minimal sexual differences in parental activities

Overall, the sexes show equal investment, although the degree of parental effort developed differs depending on the specific activities, and female selection of mates and the particular ecology of this species are discussed.

Parental investment asymmetries of a globally endangered scavenger: unravelling the role of gender, weather conditions and stage of the nesting cycle

In Egyptian Vulture, one sex is not entirely responsible for a particular task and the compensatory effort of the other mate is required, suggesting that sex-role specialization exists for some activities.

Sex differences in parental care in the common swift (Apus apus): effect of brood size and nestling age

The results suggest that males reduce parental care when the energy requirements of the chicks decrease, while females do not, and that mâles diminuent leurs efforts parentaux lorsque les besoins energetiques des oisillons diminuents alors que les femelles ne le font pas.

TIME BUDGETS AND THE ADAPTIVENESS OF POLYANDRY IN NORTHERN JACANAS

ABSTRACr. -Time budgets of polyandrous Northern Jacanas (Jacana spinosa) were studied at a 2.8-ha pond in Costa Rica from Jan.-Dec. 1974. Time budgets differed significantly depending on reproductive

PARENTAL ROLES AND THE AMOUNT OF CARE IN A BI-PARENTAL SUBSTRATE BROODING CICHLID: THE EFFECT OF SIZE DIFFERENCES WITHIN PAIRS

The amount of parental care is largely affected by the relative size within pairs independent of sex in J. ornatus, and observations of aggressive behaviours within pairs suggest that the larger fish are likely to make the partners perform parental care.

Parental behaviour in the Lapwing Vanellus vanellus

It is suggested that the apparent division of parental roles may be explained by sexual selection, i.e. the remating opportunities for male Lapwings might be reduced if they increase their share in incubation, and the different efficiency of care provision, for example in ability to defend offspring, may also influence the roles of the sexes in parental care.

Sex roles, parental effort and offspring desertion in the monogamous Eurasian Curlew Numenius arquata

It is suggested that the most likely reasons for offspring desertion by females may be associated with increased female survivorship and maintenance of pairbond between years.

Time allocations for different activities in the fiddler crab Tubuca rosea (Tweedie, 1937) (Brachyura, Ocypodidae).

Predation risk, reproductive maturation, breeding/non-breeding season, and energy conservation could be important factors for shaping time allocations in T. rosea.

A few long versus many short foraging trips: different foraging strategies of lesser kestrel sexes during breeding

The lesser kestrel responds to changes in energy demand throughout the breeding season with its foraging movement strategy, but in a different way depending on parental sex.
...

References

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To assess advantages of bi-parental care for a species with precocial young, time budgets for adult behavior with both parents and only 1 adult tending the brood are contrasted and hypotheses for strategies of parental care in this species are suggested.

SPACING AND TIMING IN THE NESTING ECOLOGY OF A TROPICAL BLACKBIRD: COMPARISON OF POPULATIONS IN DIFFERENT ENVIRONMENTS'

Tropical marsh-dwelling Agelaius experience greater nest failure from both predation and star- vation of nestlings than do temperate marsh-nesting blackbirds, and Coloniality reduces brood parasitism as a result of the increase in male vigilance permitted by smaller territories.

Time and Energy Budgets of the Mockingbird (Mimus polyglottos) during the Breeding Season

A time and energy budget of male and female Mockingbirds in six phases of their breeding cycle was completed using the equivalent temperature model to predict perching metabolic rates, suggesting that birds may allocate time to perching to minimize the probability of predation on themselves or their offspring.

Male Parental Care and Apparent Monogamy Among Eastern Bluebirds (Sialia sialis)

In an effort to assess the effects of male parental care on female reproductive success, males were removed from breeding territories after clutch completion and the hypothesis that parental care by males is necessary for partial reproductive success of females was rejected.

Time and Energy Budgets of Territorial Hummingbirds

From laboratory data of flying and resting metabolism and field data on time budgets of territorial male Eulampis jugularis hummingbirds we were able to estimate caloric energy budgets associated

Sexual Selection and Intersexual Differences in Variance of Breeding Success

It seems reasonable to predict a significant difference in variance in breeding success between the sexes within a species from the theory of sexual selection, and this note provides a test of the prediction.

Environmental Uncertainty and the Parental Strategies of Marsupials and Placentals

  • B. Low
  • Biology
    The American Naturalist
  • 1978
A comparison of marsupial and placental parental strategies as a test of predictions about the pattern of expenditure of parental effort suggests that marsupials have long been under selection imposed by frequent loss of offspring or conditions in which termination of offspring was frequently favored.

The Evolution of Parental Behavior and Clutch Size in Shorebirds

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Breeding Season Time and Energy Budgets of the Polyandrous Spotted Sandpiper

Data of the present study support the hypothesis of EMLEN & ORING (1977) that a male increases his individual fitness by conducting most parental care because the low success rate of individual nesting attempts due to factors such as high predation rates.

Parental behavior in the Least Sandpiper (Calidris minutilla)

There was a weak (insignificant) trend for males to increase their role in incubation as it progressed, and for parents to attend young chicks throughout the period of parental attendance.