Sexual differences in morphology and niche utilization in an aquatic snake, Acrochordus arafurae

@article{Shine2004SexualDI,
  title={Sexual differences in morphology and niche utilization in an aquatic snake, Acrochordus arafurae},
  author={Richard Shine},
  journal={Oecologia},
  year={2004},
  volume={69},
  pages={260-267}
}
  • R. Shine
  • Published 1 May 1986
  • Environmental Science, Biology
  • Oecologia
Filesnakes (Acrochordus arafurae) are large (to 2 m), heavy-bodied snakes of tropical Australia. Sexual dimorphism is evident in adult body sizes, weight/length ratios, and body proportions (relative head and tail lengths). Dimorphism is present even in neonates. Two hypotheses for the evolution of such dimorphism are (1) sexual selection or (2) adaptation of the sexes to different ecological niches. The hypothesis of sexual selection is consistent with general trends of sexually dimorphic body… 
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  • R. Shine
  • Environmental Science, Biology
  • 1986
TLDR
Field studies of Acrochordus arafurae in the Alligator Rivers Region of tropical Australia show that these aquatic snakes feed and reproduce less frequently than do most other snake species studied previously, suggesting a low frequency of reproduction in individual females.
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